Panacea: Ideate, Iterate

Ideate

Ideate

The ideation process began primarily through associative exercises and heuristic intuitions.

Eventually, we began focusing on the tools surrounding the morning medication routine that could be leveraged as a sensory device. It was here when we determined that the electric toothbrush is the perfect unobtrusive accessory that can be used for dual purposes. And while the technology for a toothbrush that can perform drug tests via salivary samples exists, it has not yet been implemented into an adherence app.  With an initial concept for an accessory in place, we began conceptualizing the framework of our app.  This was done through storyboards and paper prototypes.  

Two iterations of Panacea were designed for initial prototyping.  The first design featured a simple root menu and an introductory sequence to help people enter their prescriptions and medical information quickly and seamlessly.  The second design emphasized a “gamified” approach in order to increase incentives for the apps daily use.  

Iterate

Iterate

Both paper prototypes underwent heuristic evaluation by a small sample of volunteers.  Many design flaws and possible enhancements were identified during this period.  A feature where users could track their daily mood and anxiety confused the evaluators and was ultimately nixed.   Additional onboarding screens were created in sections where evaluators consistently requested more clarity. Users were largely frustrated with the “gamified” features and they were removed.  Guided by the data from the evaluation, a comprehensive development plan for the next 4 weeks of iterating was created. A navigational skeleton and a simple wireframe were also constructed for the initial digital draft.

Some in-person user testing was conducted with our wireframe.  Among other insights, these tests revealed that users had difficulty locating the “email doctor” function in the app, and it was determined that a new category featuring the users medical team would be implemented for a more intuitive social element.  This fits well with the apps conceptual point of view of helping the user navigate the large “eco-system” involved with prescription medication, which obviously includes the users medical team.

Panacea Mockup 0.3

Email button inconveniently located deep within Profile Information.

Panacea Mockup 0.4

Email button is located in contextually relevant “medical team” area.

Interactive functionality was added to the revised mock-up in order to allow for digital prototyping.  A random sample of users were chosen through UserTesting.com to complete specific tasks while using Panacea. While new flaws were identified during these tests, results showed that users ultimately found the interface intuitive and easy to navigate. The app rated low on aesthetic appeal, however, with some users saying they would not feel comfortable entering sensitive information into the app because it did not have a professional look.  This data became the basis for an aesthetic makeover based on the principles of material design.

Panacea Mockup 0.4 

“Create Account” sequence before the aesthetic makeover.

Panacea 1.0

“Create Account” sequence after the aesthetic makeover.

In addition to an aesthetic makeover, the final mock-up featured some “quality of life” improvements inspired by the data.  This included a home page that acted like a dashboard with pertinent information displayed for the user, and an integrated calendar with inputs for both medical appointments and refill schedules. Basic Panacea Brush functionality was also included in this iteration, allowing users to sync their toothbrush and view their adherence history. 

Panacea 1.0

Panacea Brush Feature

Panacea 1.0

Scheduling Feature

A final round of testing on UserTesting.com was conducted in order to determine the effectiveness of the redesign.  Ratings were significantly higher than the previous high-fidelity mock-up by a significant degree.  Some final adjustments were made to the design and the project concluded.